Kill

Korea, South

In Soo Park aka B-Boy Kill from Korea is one of the youngest B-Boy in this year's competition. Despite his young age, he is a skilled and confident dancer. KILL is a member of famous Korean crew Gamblerz and specializes in extremely difficult power moves, but also expresses the music with foundations like top-rocks, footwork and freezes combined in a smooth flow. His signature move is the air chair in different variations executed as power move and freeze.

When In Soo was 14 years old, well-known B-Boy King So, who realized his potential early on, took him to the C.A.Y. Crew Studio in Ulsan, where he was able to watch King So and The End practice, which really impressed him. He thought the older guys were totally cool, but what really made him want to dance was the music that absolutely got him hooked.

King So took him under his wing and KILL started practicing with the C.A.Y. Crew. He watched, listened, practiced, and was largely inspired by them, especially by King So and The End. King So was also the one who came up with his B-Boy name because he felt that the kid "killed" the other dancers with his moves.

Since KILL lived on the outskirts of the city, about 1 ½ hours away from the dance studio, he practically lived in Kong So's house for over two years, going to school from there and practicing with C.A.Y crew in the evenings.

At 18 years, KILL is already an experienced performer. He doesn't get nervous in shows anymore. It's a whole other bargain in battles though. He's totally anxious when he watches his opponent throw down. He just wants to go out and throw down. "I love that feeling! It's totally thrilling!"

Apart from B-Boying, KILL is interested in photography and DJing. He hasn't really touched a turntable yet but has been watching King So a lot, who is regularly DJing. He is attracted to the idea that you can take all the music you like and play with it in any which way you want to.

His family always supported In Soo in his efforts to become a B-Boy. The only one who was against it, in the beginning, was his older brother Kwang Soo, who felt that In Soo had potential to do good at school and getting into university should have been his goal, rather than getting into the dance scene. They argued and cried a lot, but after having seen his brother's achievements and after watching him in shows, competitions and on TV, he is now also giving his full support.

The Korean Hip Hop scene developed fast. When KILL started dancing, the Korean B-Boys already dominated the international scene. "When I was little, all the Korean B-Boys seemed so amazing and really big. However, since there are so many jams in our small country, you end up seeing the same B-Boys over and over again. There are many times when I wish I had the chance to see more new B-Boys."

KILL was born in Ulsan, the industrial powerhouse of South Korea and growing up, learned about Hip Hop culture. The scene in Ulsan is pretty big compared to other regions due to the contributions of King So. "Thanks to King So, I was able to grow up in a great B-Boy scene. Of course, there is not as much going on as in Seoul, but it's just as great as any other city."

To KILL, B-Boying is about love and respect. "A good B-Boy is someone who loves to dance, loves how other people dance and knows what he wants from life and works for it. You have to become a good person before you can become a good B-Boy!"

He hasn't been involved in Hip Hop for long, but KILL really loves the culture. He feels that Hip Hop is giving many people dreams and hope. "I love how people become friends through Hip Hop, no matter if they are from different countries, speak different languages, and have different lifestyles. People of all walks of live and even different age groups are joined in one culture."

KILL is excited about having the chance to show his skills in Amsterdam in November.